Reply for Ierdan

4 posts / 0 new
Last post
Peat
Peat's picture
Offline
Last seen: 8 years 11 months ago
Joined: 2008-10-27 13:13
Reply for Ierdan

Hello Ierdan,

I don't usually correspond via e-mail as I prefer to answer any questions in the forum, that way other people can add their input along with mine.

I'm happy to help as best I can, if you don't mind I have copied part of your e-mail below and will answer them here.

"If one had two distinct plants growing in a same hydroponic system with the
other one being vegging plant and other one being a blooming plant how should
the nutrients be set."

First off, it's best practice to grow veg and fruiting plants separate, as you've read. If you absolutely must grow both together then you should dose for fruiting as the vegging phase has a higher nitrogen content, this won't be beneficial to growing fruit - in fact it may interfere with the fruiting process; peppers, for one, don't like higher nitrogen. You should really separate both plants for optimum growth.

"All the sources I've read instruct different nutrient solutions for both
stages (veg and bloom) but the setup of the system would benefit from mutual
solution.
If one would maintain say transition stage nutrient solution (GH Flora), how
would the plants develop?"

One of the main problems here is the EC level, if you were to grow say tomatoes and lettuce in the same system you would have to give the toms a higher EC for growth, this will cause major problems for your lettuce; leaf burn, bitterness... Sticking in the 'transition phase' is not really ideal in my opinion, whilst I've never done it myself I cannot comment on the outcome - I could guess that your lettuce will suffer from burn etc., and your fruiting plants will suffer from retarded fruit development (lots of vegetative growth as opposed to fruit production), but, as I say, I cannot substantiate this.

"What is your opinion about the effects of this type of nutrient solution e.g
smaller flowers, stunted growth etc?"

Any plant not fed the ideal nutrient for 'it' will suffer, you are talking slower development, malnutrition and the problems associated with over feeding...

"If the transition stage solution is not the preferable which kind of solution
would recommend?"

The preferable way would be to separate both plants and feed them what they require individually. Remember here that the pH is also important, different plants require different pH's, do your plants have the same requirements?

I'm going to have to say I cannot recommend a solution that does it all, I don't think there is one on the market, or that your could mix, that would do the job of growing both plants together successfully? Most are either 2-part veg and bloom stages or 3-part stages that require mixing to your plant type.

If it were me, I'd grow then apart. If you cannot, then I'd decide what plant you would prefer to grow and feed for that plant - the other plant will likely suffer though.

I hope this helps.

0
No votes yet
Peat
Peat's picture
Offline
Last seen: 8 years 11 months ago
Joined: 2008-10-27 13:13
Hi Ierdan, I'll cherry pick

Hi Ierdan,

I'll cherry pick some of your questions and try an answer them.

" I mean won't the plant itself regulate the nutrient intake at all depending on the stage of life it is in?"

Plants will take what they require out of your nutrient solution, certain nutes will be depleted more than others dependant on the stage of growth as you said. This could leave you with deficiencies, P & K hungry plants (tomatoes) will deplete these nutrients much more quickly than others for example. If the nutrient is too strong though, the plant can't regulate this and will suffer a variety of problems.

"However would it be possible to grow few enough plants with relatively large nute solution reservoir without the need to change the solution"

Sort of... If the tank is large and the plants are few then you can extend the period of nutrient change. You still have to watch the EC and pH though, these will still change. It would probably be wise to change the solution at some point for a fresh mix, as the plants grow they take what they want, again deficiencies if a particular chemical is used up. Also, as you add water to top up the reservoir it will weaken and lower the EC, what you do then is top-up with a weak nutrient mix to bring the EC back in line. Unfortunately what this leads to in the end is an inbalance in the mixture, say your plant has used up all the N and not touched the P, when you top up you bring the N back up to a better level but overdose on the P... That's why a reservoir change is ultimately recommended - to even the nutrients back out.

"The maintance cycle is 2 weeks. If one had reservoir of 30 liters with otherwise similar setup how would it affect the maintance cycle?"

Hard to say when you would change this, the period will definitely be extended beyond the 2 week slot. This will be trial and error, start with a longer period and see how the plants do. If there is no adverse effect then lengthen the maintenance period, obviously if there are negative effects then resume the last known period.

The 2 weeks period is not set in stone, it's just a guide really. There is nothing stopping you from changing this, many people just top off their solution as required - the 'ideal' way and going by 'the book', is to do a complete change. It's your grow and you can dictate how you proceed with it.  

Wow, tobacco and coffee - that's some project. It would be great to see you have results with this, I wouldn't know where to start nutrient wise as I've not found much on the internet. Tobacco is not my thing but growing coffee sounds interesting, although I read that it takes 3 years to mature if grown from a bean!

ierdan (not verified)
Hi all and thanks for your

Hi all and thanks for your answers,

I'm still in the process of planning and have no plants set. The engineering aspect is more interesting at this point but Tobacco and Coffee plants are something I'll propably take look into.

I was hoping to run all the stages of the growth with same nutrient solution (plant independent, actually I need to get more knowledge on EC and it's effect on plants) If I think about plants in soil outdoors, they propably also have all the nutes available all the time? I mean won't the plant itself regulate the nutrient intake at all depending on the stage of life it is in? (dependant of the light cycle perhaps?) These would of course require mild enough solutions and might actually negate the benefits of hydro/aeroponics like Peat commented.

This subject also relates to the idea of maintance free hydro system. Nutrients solutions aside, many sources, Peats including, suggest to change the nute solution every two weeks or so. However would it be possible to grow few enough plants with relatively large nute solution reservoir without the need to change the solution? The idea basically would be that when the plants eat up nutrients or water it would be proprtionaly small amount (ppm) to affect the relatively large amount of components in the reservoir, even in longer time frame. Of course I don't have any clue about the proportions needed but say AG has a capacity of some 3 liters? The maintance cycle is 2 weeks. If one had reservoir of 30 liters with otherwise similar setup how would it affect the maintance cycle?

 

Ginger
Ginger's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 1 month ago
Joined: 2008-06-23 15:55
Ditto what Peat said, of

Ditto what Peat said, of course. Though there are some fruiting plants that will do OK on weaker nutes, and some vegetative plants that do better on stronger nutes. What plants are you trying to grow?

Moderator. Author of Indoor SaladEcigs 102, and the Calm Act climate apocalyptic series.

Log in or register to post comments