pythium root rot

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Arian
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pythium root rot
 Hello everyone,
I am a beginner. I've started my gardens in January.
Recently my basil got pythium root rot. The roots became brown and the leaves were affected too, so I discarded it. Now trying to save the other herbs (roots of which got a little bit brown too) by adding a teaspoon of 3%  H2O2 every day. I am not sure if this tratment is correct and how long should I continue it. The roots of the remaining plants seem to be better in colour now, growing some new white roots.
I am afraid that the reason is of pythium was the warm water in the reservoir.
Could you give me some advice about combating the pythium?
How can I prevent the water in the reservoir from overheating? 
Thank you.

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corinne
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Occaisionally my Classics
Occaisionally my Classics reservoirs will heat up .(the only model that does that) Over the years I have found that just keeping the lid open for several hours sets things right again. It could be in a kitchen or even iin another room that is cooler..it just heats up. But that trick usually works for me.If the leaves look droopy, then I check. it doesn;t happen often, though.
Ginger
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Well, distilled is better for
Well, distilled is better for the plants in general, but... Yeah, chlorine helps combat microbes.

Moderator. Author of Indoor SaladEcigs 102, and the Calm Act climate apocalyptic series.

Arian
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 Thank you! I change the
 Thank you!
I change the water before adding nutrients once in two weeks.
sometimes I use tap water (but I used to air it out for a day or two), sometimes- distilled. 
Now I will try fresh tap water. 

Ginger
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Good luck, Arian! FWIW,
Good luck, Arian!

FWIW, fresh municipal tap water has antibiotic properties, too - the chlorine smell is dilute bleach that kills off microbes in the water supply.

Moderator. Author of Indoor SaladEcigs 102, and the Calm Act climate apocalyptic series.

Arian
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 Thanks a lot! Last week
 Thanks a lot!
Last week I've called Aerogarden customer support, sent them some photos of the sick plant and its roots, and they told me about the pythium. After that I did some research in the Internet about it. 
What about the heat, that AG is black and it is in the kitchen, and I can't move it anywhere else. I think the AG lamps are making the water warm, since they are quite low. I also often use the oven... 
If I understood you correctly, you suggest to put something on the surface to reflect the light? Great idea! I'll try to cover it with aluminium foil. 
I've changed the water immediately when learned about the pythium, and I am adding H2O2 for 8 days already. 

Ginger
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Welcome, Arian! I think the
Welcome, Arian!

I think the teaspoon of H2O2 was a great idea, but not everyday - one teaspoon per reservoir full. So, I'd suggest you not repeat that. Though - dumping and refilling the reservoir, and adding a teaspoon of H2O2, could be done once a day for three days.

What led you to decide it was pythium that ailed the basil?

And - what are the sources of heat for the reservoir? Is your home especially warm? Black reservoir in sunny window? It depends where the heat is coming from, how to combat it.

1. AG lights - you could silverize or white-ize the black deck, either with something decorative or white cardboard

2. Baking in the kitchen (big one for me) - could remove AG from kitchen (something I'm not willing to do )

3. Sunny window - sun is good, but maybe a white cardboard corral around the reservoir to keep sun off of that.

Just some ideas.

Moderator. Author of Indoor SaladEcigs 102, and the Calm Act climate apocalyptic series.

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