Best way to take pictures of AG plants?

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Beth11
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Best way to take pictures of AG plants?
 Hi All,

I want to document my grow. I always have a hard time getting a decent picture because of the AG bright lights. Any tips for taking good pictures? I've got a Sony cybershot DSC-H9 camera now so I do have flexibility in settings.

thanks,
Beth
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Beth11
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 OK, that makes sense. Now I
 OK, that makes sense. Now I have to figure out how to adjust the settings on the camera. The manual isn't helpful and the battery just died! 

 

 

 

 

Ginger
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Cool, Beth. No, usually I
Cool, Beth. No, usually I leave the AG light on. So the picture would be over-exposed, except that I keep "exposure compensation" down to 0.7.

I think I originally took a series of pictures, stepping the exposure compensation, and picked the one that looked best.

Sometimes I take a shot both with and without flash, and pick whichever comes out best. Usually, I choose without flash, but it depends. If the AG is by far the dominant light in the room, and there are unlit leaves, the shot needs flash as well, sort of thing.

Edit: cross-posted. Yes, probably "exposure value" down to 0.7 and see how it goes.

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Beth11
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 I understand the macro and
 I understand the macro and focus. This camera has exposure value settings. Set that to 0.7? 

 

 

 

 

Beth11
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 Hi Gisette, The photo
 Hi Gisette,

The photo editor that Sony uses has that brightness feature for light and dark areas. Do you turn the AG light off and then brighten the pictures? 

 

 

 

 

Ginger
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I think the most important
I think the most important thing I did for plant photo quality, was to set my camera's "exposure compensation" to 0.7. That's helpful for summer plant pictures outdoors, too, I think. Also, use the closeup setting whenever taking photos closer than 12" to something. And be sure that the camera is focusing on what you want focused, especially in closeup mode. With my camera, there's a half-click on the shutter button that selects what to focus on, then I can move (slightly!) to frame the picture and keep that half-click's focal length.

If that didn't make sense, imagine trying to photograph two faces, with a distant volcano between them. Focal distance 4 feet, infinity, 4.1 feet. Half-click on face 1, then artistically frame face1 + volcano + face2, then full click to take the photo.

I also use Picasa to edit my photos (the windows application, not the web photo storage depot.) And it has a cool tool called "fill light", which I wish every photo editing app had... Rather than whole-photo brightness, "fill light" brightens only the dark parts, which is what I mean.

I think those are the main tricks. And knowing whatever your camera does poorly. Mine tends to oversaturate red, sadly.

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