AG County Fair seed kits

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Ginger
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AG County Fair seed kits

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Did y'all see Aerogrow has released another County Fair series seed kit? Ruby Heirloom Tomatoes - full-sized heirloom tomatoes, two per kit. For high-light Aerogardens only, like the Mega Tomatoes kit.

Apparently these come with new nutrient formulations. In the latest catalog they specify that booster nutrients aren't needed by the County Fair series (nutes already adjusted for growing only in the high-light systems). They sell booster nutes for anything else using the MG kit in the Deluxe-height AG's.

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pauls (not verified)
I've had my AG ever since

I've had my AG ever since seeing it on TV and love being able to start plants off sooner indoors then transplanting them outdoors once the weather is nicer. I get seeds from various sites, one i heard about easy saver complaints and disagreed with them i love being a member and getting discounts on so many purchases online.

Ginger
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Beth, nope, haven't tried

Beth, nope, haven't tried Jericho. I have a heatwave lettuce mix and Simpson Elite from Burpee that've done well, and Korean red curl from EvergreenSeeds that seems to tolerate ... an astonishing breadth of abuse.

I think all romaines do better with heat than almost all looseleafs. To a point... I've heard 85° is about their limit.

I'm a fair bit north of you in Connecticut. September is primetime Indian summer - harvest peak for anything that isn't dead yet. Melons... I'd like a rematch someday with a bigger garden. I tried cantaloupe once and got one fruit the size of a golfball. I live in condos, so just have little scraps of garden & containers I can get away with growing food in, so long as it's heavily camouflaged by flowers.

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Beth11
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Hi Gisette,   Have you tried

Hi Gisette,

  Have you tried Jericho lettuce?  It is a romaine specially bred for heat tolerance.  Originated in Israel.  I have seeds, but haven't tried it.  I never get around to a second lettuce planting.

  Yeah, I gave up on melons because of powdery mildew.  The zucchini I grow is rampicante from pinetree.  Huge plant.  Roots wherever the stems touch the ground.  That is supposed to help it survive squash vine borer.  No help against squash bugs.  Worked out well starting it in July and keeping it covered until it flowered.  By the time it roamed all over the garden, I really didn't care.  (September garden blues - everything looks sad).

 

Beth

 

 

 

 

 

Ginger
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Oh - and I haven't tried this
Oh - and I haven't tried this yet, but I ran into Yet Another Treatment for powdery mildew online : spray leaves with one part milk to something like 10 parts water, once a week. My zucchini last year died of mildew, once I got the upper hand over the squash bugs and beetles...

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Ginger
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Beth! My hero! Squash bugs

Beth! My hero!

Squash bugs and cucumber beetles were the bane of my existence last summer. I never thought to just plant them later! Hmmmm!

I did try putting a baby cuke plant in a bag I sewed out of cheesecloth. Not a notable success. The rains came, and the bag was a mess. A cuke that cucumber beetles don't like would be a real godsend... Unfortunately, I really love my particular varieties of cucumber.

I'm trying one cuke earlier this summer, too - with the kozy koats dodge.

Shoreline Connecticut sounds pretty similar to Maryland bugwise. I'll take your slugs and squash bugs and beetles and aphids, and raise you caterpillars and rust and powdery mildew and... Yeah. Fertile place. Alas, the lettuce doesn't do much better indoors for me in summer because I keep the AC set to 78°. So one of my quests lettuce-wise is to find varieties that survive heat - indoors. So far, romaines and Korean red curl are the winners there. Both fairly crunchy, too - you seemed kinda eh on the super-soft-leaf types.

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Beth11
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Hi All,     I'd love to see a

Hi All,

 

  I'd love to see a cuc that is all female flowers, self-pollinating and short!  Get this, perfect flowers are also called hermaphroditic!  Gotta love those botanists.  BTW, there is also a pathernocarpic (self-pollinating) zucchini variety that Johnny's sold last year (didn't look for it this year) - for greenhouse growing.  I'm sure it is a large viny plant, though.  I was going to buy it last year for the outdoor garden.  Thought was that I could keep it covered with floating row cover and exclude squash vine borer and those dreaded squash (stink) bugs.  I ended up just planting my zucc's late (mid July) and it worked out great. I do grow a parthenocarpic cuc in the outdoor veggie garden.  Tasty Jade from Johnny's.  All female flowers, set fruit without pollination, tastes wonderful but grows 10' in length.  Not really tasty to striped or spotted cucumber beetles (yeah!).  I could tell you stories of the bugs in southern Maryland.  Grow it and they will come.  Don't let anyone tell you that asparagus is generally pest free if you live here...

 

Beth

 

 

 

 

Ginger
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Hm. I glanced at the County

Hm. I glanced at the County Fair kit user manual again... The pollination instructions are only for the nightshade family (tomato/pepper/eggplant), not the cucurbits. You can shake to pollinate nightshades because the flowers are "perfect" - both sexes in each flower. (One wonders how this rated the term "perfect", eh? ) Cucurbits have separate male and female flowers. Granted, sneezing nearby would be enough to pollinate zucchini - the male flowers are huge. But they might plan to sell a cuke that doesn't need pollination...

Or they may not plan to sell a cuke or zuke kit.

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PolarVrtx (not verified)
Definitely... the AG manual

Definitely... the AG manual that comes with the seed starter tray says 6-8 weeks, but my plants were way too big for it well before that! I'd say 4 weeks, tops, depending on what you're growing.

I'm looking forward to that Zucchini too

Ginger
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I'm still holding out for

I'm still holding out for their County Fair zucchini kit ! 

The seed starting in March won't last long, though, will it? Starting seeds for outdoors, they shouldn't stay hydroponic for more than a few weeks. I was planning on doing that with my Pro100 (minus the seed starter kit - just 7 on the normal surface) sometime this spring, to start tomatoes and eggplants. Even given how really, really slow eggplant are, I figured it would only use the pro100 3-4 weeks. (Would plant the eggplant and maybe peppers a couple weeks before the tomatoes...)

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PolarVrtx (not verified)
I saw this! I'm excited about

I saw this! I'm excited about it! I wish I had waited a month and gotten these instead of the mega-cherries  I tried to talk my mom in to growing them, but she is waiting to use her big AG for seed starting in March.